Wednesday, 25 June 2014

THE DAYS OF JUNE AT JPCI

Whats Growing On! 

Even with a little later start then usual we are off to our most productive year ever here at JPCI! We have already harvested over a thousand pounds of food that has been donated to food banks, sold at local markets, and given to volunteers. We have been taking care of chickens an invaluable tool to teach people compassion, responsibility  food security and create a stronger connection to their food! We have had super successful farmers markets at the Souraren Farmers Market raising tons of money to support our programming and offer high school kids summer jobs! Karma Food Co-Op, West End Food Co-Op and lots of local restaurants are purchasing our vegetables some of the most beautiful and local offered in Toronto right now!  Birds, bees, and Butterflies are flocking back home to the oasis we have build for them; milkweed is flowering all throughout the garden getting ready for the monarchs majestic flight! Our Compost is consistently hot, we have had very little flooding issues which plagued us last year.   
Classes helping out with hot crop planting
Schools around the Lawrence heights area have been very involved helping out in all aspects of the garden! We have started mushroom patches throughout the garden using donated wood-chips from local arborisits; the rains of fall should bring a bounty of winecap and shaggy mane mushrooms!
We are currently working on finishing our chicken tractor and making a portable quail home. Cortunix Quail are a very small quiet docile bird that lay prolific amounts of small speckled eggs. We will also be building a cob oven and seating area complete with a composting toilet. Years of continued cover cropping have really shown to
Collard Rows
make all the difference white and red clovers have been consuming our walkways absorbing and locking in excess water and nitrogen! There is still so much to grow and do this year and i hope that you all can make it up and help us out or visit us at the Souraren Farmers Market. We are going to share a bunch of photos from the last couple of weeks i hope you find them inspiring! Thanks so much for your continued support.
Melting snow and rain early in the season caused a couple of rivers. We dug out our walkways a couple feet, filled them with inoculated woodchips which is slowly breaking down and turning into a sponge. The leftover com[acted clay will be used in our cob structures!

Adding the chips!
Beds waiting for seed in may! We are using drip hose this year to more efficiently water with less wasted time and resources
sometimes things grow too fast!

Collaring our collards help to defend them from early season cut worm. A small viscous grub that can destroy a whole seasons worth of work in the greenhouse.
brassica and alliums benefit and compliment each other! here is some garlic and broccoli
Broccoli and Garlic a month later; this time with fresh picked scapes!
harvest knives and overwintered kale! I highly recommend broadcasting kale seed in late fall, it will sit dormant and explode out of the ground first thing in the spring no need to grow in a greenhouse

Pea Patches



Composting Vetch and spring weeds creates the perfect condition for mushrooms!

foxglove sending out its flower spike










Kale going to flower for the bees and sees 
Carrots and Purslane growing in harmony! Purslane has a shallow root system that doesn't compete with carrots! Also offers shade to help with the carrots germination. 

Worm castings set out to dry!





Harvests of Red Belle Radish, fighitng slugs with lucky beer, dandelion wine, and mint walkways!

beautiful mustard greens
green wavy kale
Student Volunteers helping run the farm stands! 
Aga at our first market of the year.
we move everything around the city via bike, sometimes its tiring, but always worth it


sometimes we dry our greens in pillowcases!




Red Callaloo, Hakurei turnip, argula pesto and so much more! 

The perennial beds always seem to have a life of their own!
Radish Hands! 






















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